Immunisation Horizon Scanning Volume 5 Issue 8

September 3, 2013
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Talking with and advising parents about childhood immunisation

September 3, 2013

Source: Journal of Health Visiting, 1 (1), 15 Jan 2013, pp 8 – 12

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Date of publication: 2013

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Immunisation is the most highly effective public health intervention available, after clean water, for preventing ill health and its consequences in children. The promotion of immunisation is a key component of the Healthy Child Programme (Department of Health (DH), 2009), and therefore it is an important part of health visitors’ work. This article describes the main factors affecting vaccine uptake, focusing specifically on advising parents and responding to their questions and concerns.

Length of publication: 4-pages


Shingles jab campaign for people in their 70s

September 2, 2013

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: September 2013

Publication Type: News

In a nutshell: People in their 70s across the UK will be offered a vaccine against shingles from this week. The government-led programme will initially offer the vaccine to those aged 70, 78 and 79.

Length of publication: 1-page news item


Developing role of HPV in cervical cancer prevention

September 2, 2013

Source: BMJ, 2013;347:f4781

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Date of publication: August 2013

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Since the Cervical Screening Programme was introduced in England, the incidence of cervical cancer has fallen by 44% and number of deaths from the disease by 70% (fig 1). This effect has also been seen in other countries.1 2 The discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in cervical cancer and in subsequent molecular biology and epidemiological studies shows that persistent cervical infection with “high risk” HPV types is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. This finding has led to two major developments in cervical cancer control: immunisation as a means of primary prevention and HPV testing in cervical screening, which is poised to replace cytology as the primary screening modality. This article reviews the evidence base for evolving from exfoliative cytology alone to a dual approach of HPV vaccination and HPV based cervical screening.

Length of publication: 7-page article


Meningitis B

September 2, 2013

Source: The Lancet, 382 (9890), 3–9 August 2013, pp. 368

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Date of publication: August 2013

Publication Type: Editorial

In a nutshell: Invasive meningococcal disease is a serious global health threat that kills about one in 20 infected individuals. Meningitis B accounts for about 80% of cases of invasive meningococcal disease in high-income countries, 50% of whom are children younger than 2 years; it is the foremost cause of infant bacterial meningitis and severe sepsis in Europe…

Length of publication:


The price of prevention: what now for immunisation against meningococcus B?

September 2, 2013

Source: The Lancet, 382 (9890), 3–9 August 2013, pp. 369–370

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Date of publication: August 2013

Publication Type: Comment

In a nutshell: Meningococcal sepsis is one of the most dreaded bacterial infections: the death rate remains at about 5% and the effects for survivors include neurological damage, limb amputation, and widespread skin necrosis.1 There is a compelling case for prevention of meningococcal disease by immunisation…

Length of publication: 1-page


Influencing factors in MMR immunisation decision making

September 2, 2013

Source: British Journal of Nursing, Vol. 22, Iss. 15, 07 Aug 2013, pp 893 – 898

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Date of publication: August 2013

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Immunisation decision making is not a straightforward process for parents. Many factors influence parental decision making on whether they immunise their child with the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. The feasibility study described in this article provides
insight into influencing factors associated with decisions regarding the immunisation of children by parents. The study findings suggest that the practice nurse is a credible source of information for parents seeking informed decision making. At a time when the incidence of measles and mumps is rising in the UK, the provision of appropriate information by the practice nurse has the potential to increase uptake of the MMR vaccine.

Length of publication: 6-page article