Immunisation Horizon Scanning Bulletin Volume 2 Issue 10

November 26, 2010

Toddlers to get ‘six in one’ jab

November 22, 2010

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: November 2010

Publication Type: News-Item

In a nutshell: Young children are to be immunised against six diseases at once, the Government has confirmed. After their first birthday toddlers will be offered a single appointment to have three injections to guard against measles, mumps, rubella, two types of meningitis and a form of pneumonia. This replaces the existing NHS policy for England and Wales of spacing the vaccines over a couple of months. The change is designed to boost vaccination rates.

Length of publication: 1 page news-item


Exploring the needs, concerns and behaviours of people with existing respiratory conditions in relation to the H1N1 ‘swine influenza’ pandemic: a multicentre survey and qualitative study.

November 16, 2010

Source: Health Technology Assessment, 2010 Jul;14(34):1-108.

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Date of publication: July 2010

Publication Type: Multicentre Survey and Qualitative Study

In a nutshell: BACKGROUND: People with respiratory conditions are a ‘high-risk’ group for H1N1 pandemic swine influenza (‘swine flu’), hence they and their families may have information needs, worries and concerns regarding the condition. Health-related behaviours, including vaccination, are recommended during the pandemic; understanding uptake of these is important… CONCLUSIONS: Participants were generally well-informed about swine flu, but more targeted information would have been welcomed. Participants were not highly anxious about swine flu, but did recognise risks for patients. Behaviour change was modest, but in line with recommendations. Vaccination intent was high.

Length of publication: Unknown


The impact of communications about swine flu (influenza A H1N1v) on public responses to the outbreak: results from 36 national telephone surveys in the UK

November 16, 2010

Source: Health Technology Assessment, 2010 Jul;14(34):183-266.

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Date of publication: July 2010

Publication Type: Survey

In a nutshell: OBJECTIVES: To assess the association between levels of worry about the possibility of catching swine flu and the volume of media reporting about it; the role of psychological factors in predicting likely uptake of the swine flu vaccine; and the role of media coverage and advertising in predicting other swine flu-related behaviours… CONCLUSIONS: During the swine flu outbreak, uptake rates for protective behaviours and likely acceptance rates for vaccination were low. One reason for this may in part be explained by was the low level of public worry about the possibility of catching swine flu. When levels of worry are generally low, acting to increase the volume of mass media and advertising coverage is likely to increase the perceived efficacy of recommended behaviours, which, in turn, is likely to increase their uptake.

Length of publication: Unknown


Seasonal flu vaccination for healthcare workers?

November 15, 2010

Source: Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin, 2010 Nov;48(11):122-5.

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Date of publication: November 2010

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: In the UK, the Department of Health (DH) recommends annual immunisation of healthcare workers against influenza1 to reduce the likelihood of nosocomial influenza transmission, particularly to vulnerable patients. However, although vaccination services to meet this need are available and provided free of charge to the recipient, uptake is often poor.2 Here we review the evidence for reduced influenza transmission and other benefits with seasonal vaccination of healthcare workers, and examine what influences vaccine uptake.

Length of publication: Unknown


Economic evaluation of infant and adolescent hepatitis B vaccination in the UK

November 15, 2010

Source: Vaccine, 2010 Nov 10. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication: November 2010

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: A Markov model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) disease progression in the UK estimated that 81% of predicted HBV-associated morbidity and mortality could be prevented by universal infant vaccination at a cost of approximately £260,000 per QALY gained. Universal adolescent vaccination would be less effective (45% prevented) and less cost-effective (£493,000 per QALY gained). Higher HBV incidence rates in males and intermediate/high risk ethnic populations meant it was approximately 3 times more cost-effective to vaccinate these groups. At current vaccine costs a selective infant vaccination programme, based on vaccinating intermediate/high risk ethnic populations would not be considered cost effective. The threshold cost per vaccinated child at which the programme would be considered cost-effective was investigated. Universal infant vaccination would be cost-effective if the average cost of vaccinating each child against HBV, including vaccine and administration costs of all doses, was less than £4.09. Given the low cost of vaccination required to make a universal programme cost-effective the most feasible policy in the UK would be to use a suitably priced combined vaccine that included the other antigens in the current infant vaccination schedule.

Length of publication: Unknown


Pragmatic management of programmatic vaccination errors – Lessons learnt from incidents in London

November 15, 2010

Source: Vaccine, 2010 Oct 29. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication: October 2010

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Correct storage, handling and administration of vaccines are vital components of a successful immunisation programme. However, with the large number of different healthcare professionals now involved in delivering the vaccine programme on a daily basis, it is inevitable that programmatic errors will occur. Decisions as to how best to rectify these errors can be difficult however, as often they are unprecedented and there may be no hard evidence on which to base their management. These decisions must therefore be based on what is known and any available previous experience. They also often take place in an environment of concern about litigation and liability which puts pressure on health care workers to take a defensive or conservative approach. Management decisions may ultimately also have to be a pragmatic choice based on the individual situation and what is deemed to be the best way to minimise adverse reactions, ensure patients are adequately protected and maintain public confidence in the immunisation programme. Here, we describe our experiences of managing vaccine programmatic errors and some of the many factors that we had to consider.

Length of publication: Unknown