Immunisation Horizon Scanning Volume 3 Issue 7

September 1, 2011
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‘A false sense of security’? Understanding the role of the HPV vaccine on future cervical screening behaviour: a qualitative study of UK parents and girls of vaccination age

September 1, 2011

Source: Journal of Medical Screening, 2011; 18(1): 41-5

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Date of publication: August 2011

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Objectives: The UK Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme was introduced in 2008 for girls aged 12-13. The vaccine offers protection against HPV types 16 and 18, which together cause about 70% of cervical cancers. Vaccinated girls will receive future invitations to the NHS Cervical Screening Programme, to prevent cancers associated with HPV types not included in the vaccine, and in case of prior infection with HPV 16 or 18. Little is known about parents’ and girls’ understandings of the protection offered by the vaccine, or the need for future screening. Conclusions: Sufficient awareness of the issues related to screening is necessary for informed decision-making about whether or not to accept the HPV vaccine. Clearer information is needed concerning the incomplete protection offered by the vaccine, and that cervical screening will still be required. Future invitations for cervical screening should stress the necessity to attend regardless of HPV vaccination status, to ensure that high levels of prevention of cervical cancer through screening are maintained.

Length of publication: 5-page article


Factors associated with uptake of vaccination against pandemic influenza: A systematic review

September 1, 2011

Source: Vaccine, 2011; 29(38): 6472-6484

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Date of publication: September 2011

Publication Type: Systematic Review

In a nutshell: Background: In June 2009 a global influenza pandemic was declared by the World Health Organisation. A vaccination programme against H1N1 influenza was introduced in many countries from September 2009, but there was low uptake in both the general population and health professionals in many, though not all, countries. Purpose:To examine the psychological and demographic factors associated with uptake of vaccination during the 2009 pandemic. Discussion: Interventions designed to increase vaccination rates could be developed and implemented in advance of a pandemic. Strategies to improve uptake of vaccination include interventions which highlight the risk posed by pandemic influenza while simultaneously offering tactics to ameliorate this risk (e.g. vaccination)… In addition, interventions to increase seasonal influenza vaccination in advance of a future pandemic may be an effective strategy.

Length of publication: 12-page article


Genital warts and cost of care in England

September 1, 2011

Source: Sexually Transmitted Infections, 2011 Aug 3. [Epub ahead of print]

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Date of publication: August 2011

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Objectives: To estimate the total number of cases of, and cost of care for, genital warts (GWs) in England, to inform economic evaluations of human papillomavirus vaccination. Conclusions: This study provides a fairly comprehensive measure of GW frequency and care in England. GWs exert a considerable impact on health services, a large proportion of which could be prevented through immunisation using the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine.

Length of publication: Unknown


Is immunisation child protection?

September 1, 2011

Source: The Lancet, 2011; 378(9790): 465 – 468

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Date of publication: August 2011

Publication Type: Comment

In a nutshell: Refusal of parents to vaccinate their children is an example of the conflict between the best interests of children and the autonomy and interests of parents. It raises the issue of the extent to which state authority can interfere in private family life to protect children. This conflict can be approached from different ethical perspectives and theories. However, the basic underlying principle is that children’s interests need to be protected. Historically, children were viewed as the property of their parents, but they are now recognised as vulnerable and dependent individuals who are in need of protection through instruments such as children’s rights.

Length of publication: 4-pages


School nurses’ experiences of delivering the UK HPV vaccination programme in its first year

August 31, 2011

Source: BMC Infectious Diseases, 2011 Aug 24;11(1):226

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Date of publication: August 2011

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Background: In the United Kingdom (UK) in September 2008, school nurses began delivering the HPV immunisation programme for girls aged 12 and 13 years old. This study offers insights from school nurses’ perspectives and experiences of delivering this new vaccination programme. Conclusion: Overall the first year of the implementation of the HPV vaccination programme in the UK has exceeded school nurses’ expectations and some of its success may be attributed to the school nurses’ commitment to the programme.

Length of publication: 31-page article


Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination in a child with suspected egg allergy

August 31, 2011

Source: British Medical Journal, 2011 Aug 3;343:d4536. doi: 10.1136/bmj.d4536

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Date of publication: Augsut 2011

Publication Type: 10-Minute Consultation

In a nutshell: A mother presents with her 12 month old son requesting testing for an egg allergy before the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination; his older sister has a severe egg allergy. What should you do?

Length of publication: 2-page article