Immunisation Horizon Scanning Volume 5 Issue 9

October 8, 2013
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The immunisation of children and young people: an update

October 8, 2013

Source: British Journal of School Nursing, 8 (7); 13 Sep 2013, pp 336

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: September 2013

Publication Type: Article

In a nutshell: A Men C vaccine booster has recently been introduced into this year’s children and young people’s routine immunisation schedule. This article aims to provide an update on the immunisation schedule, planned changes and some of the vaccines that are currently being discussed for inclusion.

Length of publication: 1-page article


All two and three-year-olds in Scotland offered flu vaccine

October 8, 2013

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: September 2013

Publication Type: News

In a nutshell: A flu vaccine nasal spray is being offered to every two and three-year-old in Scotland for the first time. Previously, only children in “at risk” groups were offered the protection.

Length of publication: 1-page news item


England’s MMR jabs ‘highest ever’

October 8, 2013

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: September 2013

Publication Type: News

In a nutshell: The number of two-year-olds who have received the MMR vaccination in England is at its highest level since the jab was introduced more than 20 years ago.

Length of publication: 1-page news item


Measles: the legacy of low vaccine coverage

October 8, 2013

Source: Archives of Disease in Childhood, 2013; 98: pp. 752-754 

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Date of publication: 2013

Publication Type: Article

In a nutshell: Measles is among the most infectious diseases of humans. Prior to the introduction of vaccination, virtually every child in the UK caught measles during two-yearly epidemics that each involved up to 700 000 reported cases. The illness presents with fever, coryza, cough and conjunctivitis before progressing to the classic rash after 2–4 days.1 Complications are more common in the very young and in adults and include otitis media, pneumonia, diarrhoea, keratitis and encephalitis. Although measles still kills around 150 000 children per year worldwide, in industrialised countries, case-fatality ratios are low with around one death for every 2000–5000 reported cases.1 ,2 The infection is most serious for individuals who are immunosuppressed, who may experience diffuse progressive pneumonitis or a delayed form of encephalitis, both associated with a high risk of death. For example, between 1974 and 1984, nearly one-third of deaths in British children in remission from leukaemia were measles related.3 The WHO aims to achieve measles elimination in at least five WHO regions by 2020, with the elimination target for the European region set at 2015

Length of publication: 3-page article


Further dissemination

October 8, 2013

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