Immunisation Horizon Scanning Volume 6 Issue 2

March 10, 2014
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Examining inequalities in the uptake of the school-based HPV vaccination programme in England: a retrospective cohort study

March 6, 2014

Source: Journal of Public Health, (2014) 36 (1): 36-45

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: March 2014

Publication Type: Article

In a nutshell: Background Although uptake of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is high in the United Kingdom, it is unknown whether the programme has been delivered equitably by ethnicity or deprivation. This study aimed to investigate factors associated with HPV vaccine initiation and completion within the routine HPV vaccination programme in the South West of England. Methods Data were retrieved for young women eligible for routine vaccination from 2008/09 to 2010/11 from three Primary Care Trusts (PCTs)/local authorities. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed to examine factors associated with uptake of HPV vaccination. Results Of 14 282 eligible young women, 12 658 (88.6%) initiated, of whom 11 725 (92.6%) completed the course. Initiation varied by programme year (86.5–89.6%) and PCTs/local authorities (84.8–91.6%). There was strong evidence for an overall difference of initiation by ethnicity (P < 0.001), but not deprivation quintile (P = 0.48). Young women educated in non-mainstream educational settings were less likely to initiate and, if initiated, less likely to complete (both P < 0.001). Conclusions HPV vaccination uptake did not vary markedly by social deprivation. However, associations with ethnicity and substantially lower uptake in non-mainstream educational settings were observed. Research to identify reasons for low vaccine uptake in these population groups is required.

Length of publication: 9-page article


MMR vaccination at right time is associated with lower admissions for all infections in young children

February 27, 2014

Source: BMJ2014;348:g1779

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Date of publication: February 2014

Publication Type: News

In a nutshell: Young children who receive the live measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR vaccine) on schedule after vaccination against other common infections have a lower rate of hospital admission for any type of infection than children who are not vaccinated within the recommended timing or sequence, a Danish nationwide study has shown. Researchers followed up 495 987 children born from 1997 to 2006 aged 11 months to two years, using data from Danish national registers on vaccinations and hospital admissions.

Length of publication: 1-page

For more informationLive vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella and the risk of hospital admissions for nontargeted infections. JAMA 2014, 311(8), pp. 826-835


The need for a gender-neutral approach to HPV immunisation

February 27, 2014

Source: British Journal of School Nursing, 9 (1), 14 Feb 2014, pp. 15 – 16

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Date of publication: February 2014

Publication Type: Comment

In a nutshell: In some countries, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been recommended for boys. In light of recent calls from HPV Action for a gender-neutral approach to HPV immunisation, Ian Peate looks at the benefits of extending the programme to boys.

Length of publication: 2-page comment


Increased measles–mumps–rubella (MMR) vaccine uptake in the context of a targeted immunisation campaign during a measles outbreak in a vaccine-reluctant community in England

February 27, 2014

Source: Vaccine, 32 (10), 26 February 2014, pp. 1147–1152

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: February 2014

Publication Type: Article

In a nutshell: Highlights: Reactive vaccination to a measles outbreak implemented in a vaccine-rejecting community; We estimated the number of MMR doses given in 2011 during the outbreak; The number of doses increased during the outbreak compared to previous years; Children already vaccinated were more amenable to reactive vaccination; A few parents changed their mind and vaccinated their children for the first time.

Length of publication: 5-page article


Further dissemination

February 27, 2014

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