The impact of meningitis vaccines and their future role

May 6, 2016

Source: Prescriber, 2016, 27 (3), pp. 37-41

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication Type: Analysis

In a nutshell: The success of the meningococcal group A (MenA) vaccination in the African meningitis belt, public support for the extension of the MenB vaccination in the UK and the importance of vaccination in the fight against antimicrobial resistance all endorse the need for additional meningitis vaccines in the future.

Length of publication: 5 page article


Updates to the UK child and adolescent vaccination schedule

May 6, 2016

Source: Nurse Prescribing, 2016, 14 (3), pp. 120-125

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: After clean water, immunisation is the most effective public health intervention for the prevention of disease and an important component of the Healthy Child Programme (HCP) (Department of Health (DH), 2009). Nurses working in primary care should be trusted and key sources of advice for parents on the childhood immunisation programme, but keeping up to date can prove challenging in view of frequent changes to the schedule. This article describes the most recent changes, including the introduction of meningococcal B and ACWY vaccines to the schedule and the extension of the influenza vaccine to some older children. The success of the rotavirus programme is described and continuing issues for the maternal pertussis and influenza vaccine programmes are discussed. In addition, possible future changes to the human papillomavirus and hepatitis B programmes are outlined.

Length of publication: 6 page article


Meningitis B vaccine calls rejected despite petition

May 5, 2016

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication Type: News

In a nutshell: Offering the meningitis B vaccine to all children is “not cost effective” and would be a waste of NHS money, the UK government says. Public support for extending the vaccine grew after the mother of two-year-old Faye Burdett shared pictures of her dying from the infection. The jab is offered to children in their first year of life. But more than 800,000 people signed a petition for it to be given to all children under 11.

Length of publication: 1 page news story


The effect of sucrose as pain relief/comfort during immunisation of 15-month-old children in health care centres: a randomised controlled trial

February 15, 2016

Source: Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25 (3-4), pp. 372–380, February 2016

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Aims and objectives: To investigate the effect of 30% sucrose compared with a placebo (water) as pain relief and comfort during immunisation of 15-month-old children in health care centres. Background: Children experience different levels of pain and distress during immunisation. Sweet solutions function as pain relief during immunisation for infants up to one year of age. However, there are few studies of older children. Design: An experimental design in which the participants (15-month-old infants) were randomly assigned to an intervention group that received a 30% sugar solution or a control group that received a placebo (water). Methods: The study was performed at three health care centres in a large Norwegian municipality. The parents of all 15-month-old infants who were recommended for vaccination (for measles, mumps and rubella) between 5 September 2013 and 31 March 2014 were invited to have their infant participate. Duration of crying was the outcome measure. Results: A total of 114 children were included (59 in the intervention group, 55 in the control group). The intervention group infants’ crying was shorter (18 seconds mean) compared with the control group infants (33 seconds mean). The difference in crying duration between the groups was both statistically and clinically significant. Conclusion: This trial revealed that 30% sucrose orally has a calming and pain-relieving effect on 15-month-old infants during immunisation. Relevance to clinical practice: Public health nurses should use a 30% sucrose solution for pain relief during immunisation of 15-month-old infants.

Length of publication: 9 pages


Meningitis vaccine should be followed up with paracetamol

October 12, 2015

Source: Nursing Times

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Date of publication: September 2015

Publication Type: News

In a nutshell: Nurses delivering a new vaccine protecting against meningitis should encourage parents to give their children paracetamol following immunisation, due to increased risk of fever. It marks a change from previous advice warning against paracetamol use after immunisation due to study evidence that it could reduce the efficacy of vaccinations.

Length of publication: 1-page


Saving lives from meningitis in 2015

September 7, 2015

Source: Practice Nursing, 2015, 6 (9), pp. 422 

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Date of publication: September 2015

Publication Type: Editorial

In a nutshell: This has been a landmark year in combatting meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia, with MenACWY vaccination for adolescents beginning over the summer, and the long-awaited introduction of MenB vaccine for babies from September. Meningococcal disease remains the most important cause of bacterial meningitis and septicaemia in healthy UK babies, toddlers and young adults.

Length of publication: 1-page


Meningitis B vaccinations start across UK for all newborns

September 7, 2015

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: September 2015

Publication Type: News

In a nutshell: A new programme to vaccinate all newborn babies against meningitis B has started in the UK – the first scheme of its kind in the world.

Length of publication: 1-page news story