Updates to the UK child and adolescent vaccination schedule

May 6, 2016

Source: Nurse Prescribing, 2016, 14 (3), pp. 120-125

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: After clean water, immunisation is the most effective public health intervention for the prevention of disease and an important component of the Healthy Child Programme (HCP) (Department of Health (DH), 2009). Nurses working in primary care should be trusted and key sources of advice for parents on the childhood immunisation programme, but keeping up to date can prove challenging in view of frequent changes to the schedule. This article describes the most recent changes, including the introduction of meningococcal B and ACWY vaccines to the schedule and the extension of the influenza vaccine to some older children. The success of the rotavirus programme is described and continuing issues for the maternal pertussis and influenza vaccine programmes are discussed. In addition, possible future changes to the human papillomavirus and hepatitis B programmes are outlined.

Length of publication: 6 page article


An update on immunization in UK

February 23, 2016

Source: Paediatrics and Child Health

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: The immunization schedule changes frequently and it is important that healthcare professionals keep up to date. Parents often look to specialists for advice about vaccinating their children and place more trust in them, than government bodies. This article describes the introduction of meningococcal B and ACWY vaccines and the extension of influenza vaccine to some older children. The success of the rotavirus and maternal pertussis programmes is noted. Possible changes to the HPV and hepatitis B programmes are discussed as are vaccines for the future such as varicella, RSV and Group B streptococcus. Extra vaccines/doses for children with chronic disorders are briefly described. Keywords: hepatitis B; HPV; immunization; influenza; meningococcal ACWY; meningococcal B; pertussis; rotavirus; vaccine

Length of publication: 5 pages


School-based intervention for the prevention of HPV among adolescents: a cluster randomised controlled study

February 22, 2016

Source: BMJ Open, 2016;6:e009875.

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Objective To improve primary prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection by promoting vaccination and increased condom use among upper secondary school students. Design Cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting 18 upper secondary schools in Sweden. Participants Schools were first randomised to the intervention or the control group, after which individual classes were randomised so as to be included or not. Of the 832 students aged 16 years invited to participate during the regular individual health interview with the school nurse, 751 (90.2%) agreed to participate and 741 (89.1%) students completed the study. Interventions The intervention was based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). According to HBM, a person’s health behaviour can be explained by individual beliefs regarding health actions. School nurses delivered 30 min face-to-face structured information about HPV, including cancer risks and HPV prevention, by propagating condom use and HPV vaccination. Students in the intervention and the control groups completed questionnaires at baseline and after 3 months. Main outcome measures Intention to use condom with a new partner and beliefs about primary prevention of HPV, and also specifically vaccination status and increased condom use. Results All statistical analyses were performed at the individual level. The intervention had a significant effect on the intention to use condom (p=0.004). There was also a significant effect on HBM total score (p=0.003), with a 2.559 points higher score for the intervention group compared to the controls. The influence on the HBM parameters susceptibility and severity was also significant (p<0.001 for both variables). The intervention also influenced behaviour: girls in the intervention group chose to have themselves vaccinated to a significantly higher degree than the controls (p=0.02). No harms were reported. Conclusions The school-based intervention had favourable effects on the beliefs about primary prevention of HPV, and increased the HPV vaccination rates in a diverse population of adolescents.

Length of publication: 12 page article


HPV vaccine acceptance in male adolescents

September 7, 2015

Source: Psycho-Oncology, 2015

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Date of publication: August 2015

Publication Type: Letter

In a nutshell: Policymakers are under increasing pressure in the UK and other countries to consider the merit of a gender neutral vaccination. This correspondence does not aim to provide a scientific opinion on whether to implement the vaccine or not. It does however highlight the importance of understanding vaccine acceptance in adolescent boys to enhance the uptake of vaccines in this population group, should a decision to implement a gender neutral vaccine be reached or have already been made.

Length of publication: 3 pages


Recent changes to the routine childhood immunization schedule

September 1, 2015

Source: Practice Nursing, 2015, 26 (8), pp. 386 – 392

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Date of publication: August 2015

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Practice nurses play a key role in both promoting the uptake of immunizations and administering them, ensuring that every child benefits from this important public health intervention. Karen Ford discusses recent changes to the childhood immunization schedule

Length of publication: 6-page article


HPV immunisation programme: An update

July 28, 2015

Source: British Journal of School Nursing, 2015, 10 (5): 217-20.

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Date of publication: June 2015

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Dorothy Lepkowska provides an update on the HPV immunisation programme’s progress, and looks at the uptake rates and the impact on health so far.

Length of publication: 3-page article


‘I didn’t even know boys could get the vaccine’: Parents’ reasons for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination decision making for their sons

July 20, 2015

Source: Psycho-Oncology, 2015, 10.1002/pon.3894

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Date of publication: July 2015

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Objective: The study’s objective was to examine parents’ reasons for their decision to vaccinate their 9–16-year-old sons with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. ‘I didn’t even know boys could get the vaccine’: Parents’ reasons for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination decision making for their sons… Conclusion: There are important differences in the factors that influence parents’ decision depending on where they are along the decision-making trajectory. Assuring that parents are well informed about the importance of male vaccination, reducing vaccine cost, accurately communicating vaccine safety, and improving patient–provider communication may augment vaccine coverage and prevent HPV-associated cancers

Length of publication: 8-page article