Updates to the UK child and adolescent vaccination schedule

May 6, 2016

Source: Nurse Prescribing, 2016, 14 (3), pp. 120-125

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Date of publication: March 2016

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: After clean water, immunisation is the most effective public health intervention for the prevention of disease and an important component of the Healthy Child Programme (HCP) (Department of Health (DH), 2009). Nurses working in primary care should be trusted and key sources of advice for parents on the childhood immunisation programme, but keeping up to date can prove challenging in view of frequent changes to the schedule. This article describes the most recent changes, including the introduction of meningococcal B and ACWY vaccines to the schedule and the extension of the influenza vaccine to some older children. The success of the rotavirus programme is described and continuing issues for the maternal pertussis and influenza vaccine programmes are discussed. In addition, possible future changes to the human papillomavirus and hepatitis B programmes are outlined.

Length of publication: 6 page article

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An update on immunization in UK

February 23, 2016

Source: Paediatrics and Child Health

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Date of publication: January 2016

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: The immunization schedule changes frequently and it is important that healthcare professionals keep up to date. Parents often look to specialists for advice about vaccinating their children and place more trust in them, than government bodies. This article describes the introduction of meningococcal B and ACWY vaccines and the extension of influenza vaccine to some older children. The success of the rotavirus and maternal pertussis programmes is noted. Possible changes to the HPV and hepatitis B programmes are discussed as are vaccines for the future such as varicella, RSV and Group B streptococcus. Extra vaccines/doses for children with chronic disorders are briefly described. Keywords: hepatitis B; HPV; immunization; influenza; meningococcal ACWY; meningococcal B; pertussis; rotavirus; vaccine

Length of publication: 5 pages


Meningitis care costs more than vaccine, mother claims

January 2, 2014

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: December 2013

Publication Type: Audio Interview

In a nutshell: Campaigners have called on the government to allow meningitis B immunisation on the NHS. Doctors who advise the government say that rolling out the vaccine, called Bexsero, is not cost effective. However Julie Jenkins, whose son Louie had his legs and fingers amputated after contracting the disease, claims the after effects of meningitis are far more expensive.

 


UK rejects meningitis B vaccine

July 29, 2013

Source: BBC News

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Date of publication: July 2013

Publication Type: News

In a nutshell: The only vaccine to protect against a deadly form of meningitis should not be introduced in the UK, the body that advises governments on immunisation says.

Length of publication: 1-page news item


Protecting university students in the UK against meningococcal disease: vaccination is the way forward

March 6, 2013

Source: Perspectives in Public Health, 2013, 133 (2), pp. 90-91

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Date of publication: March 2013

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Meningococcal disease remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity in university students in the UK. Drs David Turner and Keith Neal from the University of Nottingham and Dr Simon Royal from the University of Nottingham Health Service explore the new vaccinations being developed, and believe that all university students should be offered protection against MenABCWY disease.

Length of publication: 2 page article


Challenges for development of meningococcal vaccines in infants and children

March 29, 2011

Source: Expert Review of Vaccines, 2011 Mar;10(3):335-43.

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Date of publication: March 2011

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Neisseria meningitidis causes significant disease in the form of severe sepsis syndrome or meningococcal meningitis. Owing to the susceptibility of the immune system in early life, the risk of disease after infection is significantly higher in infants. Thus far, vaccines targeted against meningococcal serogroups have struggled to provide lasting protection in young children. Even conjugate vaccines that are now routinely used in the immunization of infants require multiple dosing and the duration of protection has been shown to wane over time and require repeated booster doses. After briefly summarizing the current epidemiology according to age and serogroup, this article will consider the reasons for poor immunogenicity of vaccines in infants and will discuss the relative efficacy of the different vaccine types in this age group. It will then go on to consider strategies for optimizing the protection of infants against meningococcal disease.

Length of publication: 8-page article


NHS launches new meningitis vaccination

May 5, 2010

Source: Nursing Times

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Date of publication: April 2010

Publication Type: News-Item

In a nutshell: A new meningitis vaccination for children has been launched which experts predict could save thousands of lives. The NHS will make the jab available as part of its childhood immunisation scheme as the UK becomes one of the first countries internationally to introduce it. The vaccine offers patients greater protection against 13 strains of the disease. The previous vaccine only protected against seven. It will provide increased protection against the most lethal type of bacterial meningitis, pneumococcal meningitis.

 Length of publication: 1 page news-item