Updates to the UK child and adolescent vaccination schedule

May 6, 2016

Source: Nurse Prescribing, 2016, 14 (3), pp. 120-125

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: March 2016

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: After clean water, immunisation is the most effective public health intervention for the prevention of disease and an important component of the Healthy Child Programme (HCP) (Department of Health (DH), 2009). Nurses working in primary care should be trusted and key sources of advice for parents on the childhood immunisation programme, but keeping up to date can prove challenging in view of frequent changes to the schedule. This article describes the most recent changes, including the introduction of meningococcal B and ACWY vaccines to the schedule and the extension of the influenza vaccine to some older children. The success of the rotavirus programme is described and continuing issues for the maternal pertussis and influenza vaccine programmes are discussed. In addition, possible future changes to the human papillomavirus and hepatitis B programmes are outlined.

Length of publication: 6 page article

Advertisements

An update on immunization in UK

February 23, 2016

Source: Paediatrics and Child Health

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January 2016

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: The immunization schedule changes frequently and it is important that healthcare professionals keep up to date. Parents often look to specialists for advice about vaccinating their children and place more trust in them, than government bodies. This article describes the introduction of meningococcal B and ACWY vaccines and the extension of influenza vaccine to some older children. The success of the rotavirus and maternal pertussis programmes is noted. Possible changes to the HPV and hepatitis B programmes are discussed as are vaccines for the future such as varicella, RSV and Group B streptococcus. Extra vaccines/doses for children with chronic disorders are briefly described. Keywords: hepatitis B; HPV; immunization; influenza; meningococcal ACWY; meningococcal B; pertussis; rotavirus; vaccine

Length of publication: 5 pages


What determines uptake of pertussis vaccine in pregnancy? A cross sectional survey in an ethnically diverse population of pregnant women in London

November 17, 2015

Source: Vaccine, 33 (43), 26 October 2015, pp. 5822–5828

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: October 2015

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Highlights: Uptake of pertussis vaccine in pregnancy in our population was only 26%; Although nationally recommended, only 63% of pregnant women interviewed were even aware of the pertussis vaccination programme; Lack of encouragement from healthcare professionals was identified as the main reason; 91% of women believed healthcare professionals need to become more engaged in providing timely information about vaccines in pregnancy.

Length of publication: 6 page article


Recent changes to the routine childhood immunization schedule

September 1, 2015

Source: Practice Nursing, 2015, 26 (8), pp. 386 – 392

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: August 2015

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Practice nurses play a key role in both promoting the uptake of immunizations and administering them, ensuring that every child benefits from this important public health intervention. Karen Ford discusses recent changes to the childhood immunization schedule

Length of publication: 6-page article


Promoting vaccination

February 12, 2015

Source: Practice Nursing, 2015, 26 (1), pp 5–5

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January 2015

Publication Type: Editorial

In a nutshell: The recent publication of the MBRRACE-UK report 2009–2012 (Knight et al, 2014) into maternal deaths in the UK and Ireland has provided a reminder of the importance of the influenza vaccination programme for pregnant women. Although the maternal mortality rate has declined overall, it was found that 29 women died of influenza during pregnancy or up to 6 weeks after giving birth. Worryingly, 62% of these deaths occurred after the vaccine became universally available in pregnancy—suggesting that they could have been prevented if the vaccine had been given.

Length of publication: 1 page editorial


Vaccination uptake in pregnant women

February 12, 2015

Source: Practice Nursing, 2015, 26 (2), pp 84–87

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: January 2015

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Vaccination in pregnancy is safe and effective, but the rate of uptake is much lower than recommended. Helen Sisson encourages health professionals to continue vaccinating with confidence.

Length of publication: 4-page article


Can vaccine legacy explain the British pertussis resurgence?

December 6, 2013

Source: Vaccine, 31 (49)2 December 2013, Pages 5903–5908

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: December 2013

Publication Type: Article

In a nutshell: Highlights: • Pertussis incidence has been rising in several countries with sustained high vaccine coverage, including England and Wales; • We parameterized an age-structured pertussis model with contact patterns and vaccine uptake data from England and Wales; • The legacies of past vaccination rates and disease incidence remain in a population’s immunological signature for decades; • A history of incomplete vaccine coverage has the potential to generate a gradual resurgence in adult and adolescent cases.

Length of publication: 5-page article