Determinants of partial or no primary immunisations

August 16, 2010

Source: Archives of Diseases in Childhood, June 2010; 95: 603-605

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: June 2010

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Objective To determine if different factors affect children having full, partial or no primary immunisations. Methods This was a crossgenerational cohort study with linkage to primary care and hospital records conducted in urban and rural settings in Ireland, recruiting in 2001–2003 with 5-year follow-up. A total of 749 children with immunisation information took part. Results The uptake of reported primary immunisations was 92.8% full, 4.9% partial and 2.3% no primary immunisations. Adjusted relative risk ratios for children receiving no primary immunisations were significant for: having a mother who had ever visited an alternative practitioner 3.69 (1.05 to 12.9), a mother with means tested full general medical services eligibility 8.11 (1.58 to 41.65), a mother who scored <50 for the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHO-QOL) scale psychological domain 8.82 (1.79 to 43.6) or living in the west of Ireland (rural) 3.64 (1.0 to 13.2). Being born prematurely was associated with partial primary immunisation, adjusted OR 4.63 (1.24 to 17.3). Conclusions Knowledge of these differences will help target campaigns to increase full uptake of primary immunisations.

Length of publication: 3 page article

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Flu jab linked to fits in under fives

August 16, 2010

Source: The Telegraph

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Date of publication: July 2010

Publication Type: News-Item 

In a nutshell: Doctors should stock alternative vaccines for under fives who are due to have the seasonal flu vaccine this winter, a letter from the head of immunisation at the Department of Health has said. The action is being taken as rate of convulsions caused by high fever among children in Australia given the jab was ten times higher than normal. Up to one in 100 children given the jab, made in Australia by CSL and marketed in the UK by Pfizer, suffered febrile convulsions in the following hours and days. It is not known what is causing the problem and no other flu vaccines have been linked to an increased risk of fits. Adults given the vaccine do not appear to have been affected.

Length of publication: 1 page news-item


Impact of patient education on knowledge of influenza and vaccine recommendations among pregnant women

August 16, 2010

Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada, 2010 Mar; 32(3): 232-7

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Date of publication: March 2010

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: OBJECTIVE: To determine whether providing an information pamphlet in the antenatal clinic improves women’s knowledge about influenza and vaccine recommendations during pregnancy. METHODS: An information pamphlet was distributed in the antenatal clinic during the fall of 2007. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in women on the postpartum floor in the fall of 2006 and again in the fall of 2007 (before and after implementation of the pamphlet) to assess women’s knowledge. Results were compared to assess knowledge transfer. RESULTS: Knowledge improved with the use of the educational pamphlet. Most women in both years (>90%) correctly answered that influenza is a serious infection. However, significantly more women in 2007 correctly answered that pregnant women have a higher risk of complications from influenza (34.6% in 2007 vs. 12.1% in 2006, P < 0.001), that the influenza vaccine is safe for use during pregnancy (80.2% vs. 55.2%, P < 0.001) or breastfeeding (75.3% vs. 60.3%, P = 0.001), and that the vaccine does not cause birth defects (90.1% vs. 79.3%, P = 0.04). After implementation of the information pamphlet, a significantly higher proportion of women knew the correct recommendations for influenza vaccination during pregnancy (63.2% vs. 39.7%, P < 0.001). Vaccination rates increased from 19% in 2006 to 56% in 2007. CONCLUSIONS: Providing an information pamphlet in the antenatal clinic improved pregnant women’s knowledge about influenza and vaccine safety during pregnancy and about recommendations for influenza vaccination during pregnancy. Knowledge transfer in this area may help to increase vaccination rates.

Length of publication: 6 page article


Referrals for MMR immunisation in hospital

August 16, 2010

Source: Archives of Diseases in Childhood, April 2010; 95: 639-641

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Date of publication: April 2010

Publication Type: Report

In a nutshell: Concern exists about measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine in egg-allergic children, although this has been shown to be safe. Guidelines from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) and British Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (BSACI) suggesting which children should be referred to hospital for MMR, were published in 2000. We audited referrals to hospital for MMR against these guidelines. One hundred and ten children were referred for MMR to Birmingham Heartlands Hospital (2002–2004) and Alder Hey Children’s Hospital (2006–2009). Eighty-two (75%) children did not meet the published criteria. Only 13 children (12%) had severe egg allergy. The first dose of MMR vaccine was delayed by >30 days in 81% of children. All children were given MMR, none had a significant reaction. Children with egg allergy do not need to be given MMR in hospital, but MMR is often delayed by unnecessary hospital referral. New BSACI guidelines encouraging MMR vaccination of egg-allergic children in primary care need to be disseminated.

Length of publication: 3 page report


Vaccine patch could replace jabs

August 16, 2010

Source: NHS Choices

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Date of publication: July 2010

Publication Type: News-Item

In a nutshell:  “The conventional flu jab could be replaced by a skin patch,” says The Guardian. The patch, which is coated in microscopic dissolving spikes, is designed to deliver the flu vaccine into the skin without a syringe. The news is based on important research, and the patch’s animal trial has been covered widely. Some papers have focused on the patch as a means of delivering the flu vaccination, while others have concentrated on the potential for the patch to eliminate all injections…

Length of publication: 1 page news-item


Views towards compulsory MMR

August 16, 2010

Source: Archives of Diseases in Childhood, June 2010; 95: 658-659

Follow this link for abstract

Date of publication: June 2010

Publication Type: Letter

In a nutshell:  Annual increments in measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination coverage in England have halted, with uptake rates (mean 85%) remaining below the 95% rate needed for herd immunity.  Some commentators have called for vaccination to be made compulsory, or otherwise heavily incentivised. Two schemes were recently  debated in the UK press: MMR vaccination as a requirement for school entry (a form of “compulsory vaccination”), payments from parents of non-vaccinated children (“incentivised vaccination”)…

Length of publication: 2 page letter


Further dissemination

August 16, 2010

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