Immunisation Horizon Scanning Volume 3 Issue 9

November 18, 2011

The importance of social norms for uptake of catch-up human papillomavirus vaccination in young women

November 18, 2011

Source: Sexual Health, 2011 Sep;8(3):330-7.

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Date of publication: September 2011

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of almost all cases of cervical cancer. The current UK government immunisation program includes free routine HPV vaccination of girls aged 12–13, with a catch-up vaccination program for 13–18-year-old girls. The aim of this study was to identify correlates of intended and actual uptake of catch-up HPV vaccination. Methods: An online questionnaire was completed by 591 young women aged 16–20. Results: Of the 350 women who had been offered catch-up HPV vaccination, 90.6% had accepted. In multivariate analyses, vaccine uptake was significantly correlated with subjective norms more supportive of HPV vaccination, and greater uptake of other childhood vaccinations (χ2(3) = 39.34, P < 0.01; 91.1% correctly classified; Nagelkerke pseudo-r2 = 0.23). Among the 241 women aged 16–20 who had not been offered HPV vaccination, the average intention was 3.70 on a five-point scale. Multivariate analyses revealed four significant independent predictors of stronger intentions to accept vaccination: subjective norms more supportive of HPV vaccination, greater worry about sexually transmissible infections, greater support for young people’s sexual health services and greater support for childhood vaccination (F(4,236) = 18.67, P < 0.01; adjusted r2 = 0.23). Young women rated television advertisements, educational programs and television soaps as the most effective ways to encourage uptake of HPV vaccination. Conclusions: Uptake of HPV vaccination may be increased if interventions use appropriate media to promote social norms supportive of HPV vaccination.

Length of publication: 8-page article


Seasonal influenza: what every nurse needs to know

November 15, 2011

Source: British Journal of Nursing, 2011, Vol 20, No 19, pp 1262 – 1263

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Date of publication: October 2011

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: Professor Alan Glasper discusses this year’s seasonal influenza advice from the Department of Health in preparation for winter, and the increasing importance of influenza vaccination by nurses, for nurses.

Length of publication: 2-page article


Assessing the understanding and prior uptake of human papillomavirus vaccination among eligible females attending genitourinary medicine clinics in UK

November 15, 2011

Source: Sexually Transmitted Infections, 2011 Oct;87(6):488.

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Date of publication: October 2011

Publication Type: Letter

In a nutshell: In 2008, the UK human papillomavirus vaccination programme was introduced to vaccinate all 12–13-year-old girls, with a 2-year catch up for those aged up to 18 years. Delivery has been principally through schools and general practitioners, although concern remains that all groups are not being reached and the full three doses may not be received by all. Many young sexually active females attend genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics; therefore, this may be a potential location for vaccine delivery.

Length of publication: 1-page letter


Organisations challenge basis for recommending HPV vaccine for boys

November 15, 2011

Source: BMJ, 2011;343:bmj.d7238 (Published 7 November 2011)

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Date of publication: November 2011

Publication Type: News

In a nutshell: A recommendation that all boys in the United States receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (BMJ 2011;343:d7068, doi:10.1136/bmj.d7068) has been challenged by two medical organisations that raise questions about the financial interests of guideline writers, politicians, and organisations promoting the vaccine.

Length of publication: 1-page news-item


Are nurses who refuse to have a flu jab sending the wrong message?

November 15, 2011

Source: Nurse Prescribing, Vol. 9, Iss. 10, 14 Oct 2011, pp 474 – 477

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Date of publication: October 2011

Publication Type: News Analysis

In a nutshell: Nurses have been told that they could be putting patients’ lives in danger by refusing to take up the seasonal influenza vaccine available freely to NHS healthcare staff. According to figures from the Department of Health (DoH), fewer than a third of all nurses had the vaccine last year, with only 30% of hospital nurses and 43% of practice nurses taking up the jab.

Length of publication: 3-page news analysis


Influenza: national seasonal plan

November 15, 2011

Source: British Journal of Healthcare Assistants, Vol. 5, Iss. 10, 12 Oct 2011, pp 514 – 515

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Date of publication: October 2011

Publication Type: Journal Article

In a nutshell: The Government published its Seasonal Flu Plan for winter earlier this year and renewed attention is being given to immunizing people at risk, alongside health professionals.

Length of publication: 2-page article